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Number 18 - Capital Adventures
May 19th, 2009
09:47 pm
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Number 18



yo_sarrian reposted Chase Jarvis' checklist in his LJ. I have no interest in turning pro or semi-pro any time in the near future, and little interest in video so I skipped 3,13,19 and 20. Combine 1, 4, 5, 9 and 17 every day, and you get something very much like this journal.

And this is number 18. Anyone can do number 18. Go on, you know you want to.


Checklist for the link averse:

1. Shoot personal work. Call in some favors, get creative with no budget, and shoot something for yourself.

2. Set free that idea you've been holding onto. Write a blog post about it. Ask your friends what they think. Tell the world.

3. Learn about video. Don't have a camera? Buy drip coffee for a month instead of lattes, and buy a Flip Mino video camera with the money you save. Experiment.

4. Connect with your peers. Start a blog, dig into your Facebook. Or, hell, gather your photo friends for beers and a slide show.

5. Walk around with your camera. You don't need sunshine. Interesting weather makes interesting pictures. iPhone or one dSLR body with one lens. There is no "client". Just take pictures.

6. Rent a piece of equipment you've been wanting to learn about. Or try this rental secret: pick it up on Friday after 3pm, pay for Saturday. Sunday's are often free because the camera store is closed. Return Monday by 10am. 3 days for the price of 1.

7. Put together a book of your work. Blurb or Asuka, whatever. Affordable. Even if you don't print 10 or 100, print 1. Put it in your studio for visitors to flip through, or leave on it your coffee table at home.

8. Do the thing on your list that you most dread doing. Call that client who hasn't paid. Sign up for Twitter. Develop a marketing plan. Go to the ASMP meeting.

9. Remind yourself that the gear you can't afford is not the barrier keeping you from success. Gear has very little to do with photography.

10. Read up online about the history of photography and it's masters. Weston. Steichen. Arbus. Mapplethorpe. Adams. Doisneau. Cartier-Bresson. Avedon.

11. Admit to yourself that you don't know about something you've been pretending to know about. Sit down and do the research yourself. Learn it.

12. Go sit in front of the newsstand at some mega book store. Flip through all the magazines that interest you. Go beyond photo magazines. Generally speaking they limit your imagination rather than expand it. Spend at least an hour.

13. Make a list of 5 clients you want in the next 24 months. Shoot for the moon.

14. Rent a medium format film camera and shoot two rolls of 120. Slow down. Places will process your negs and give you scans these days for pretty cheap.

15. Look through the pictures in my portfolio and appropriate an idea. Tweak the concept and go make a better picture. It's okay. We all do it. I'm probably looking at your work right now and am grateful for the inspiration.

16. Take 100 pictures with your iPhone. Or your Samsung phone. Or your point and shoot. Whatever camera is the closest to you right this minute. The best camera is the one that's with you.

17. Refresh your website with at least one new picture. Or dig up an old one, re-process it and make it a new one.

18. Take a picture of something wherever you are when you read this post. Share it somehow, even if it isn't your favorite. Post it to your blog, twitter, or link it in the comments below. Email or MMS it to somebody who will appreciate it.

19. Quit your day job if you hate it and can live without it. People say it's a bad time to start a new business or go in a new direction. On the flipside, I think it's a great time if you've got a clear vision and a little cushion.

20. Concept, shoot, and edit a short film (video) in a single day. Keep it cheap. Keep it short. Use whatever camera you have access to.

21. Show somebody your portfolio or a selection of pictures. Let them tell you which ones they like, but also be sure to ask them which ones they don't like and why. You'll likely learn something.

22. Back up your work. It's not that hard and it'll probably save your arse at some point in the very near future.

Current Music: Supergroove - You Gotta Know
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[User Picture]
From:madshutterbug
Date:May 19th, 2009 01:14 pm (UTC)
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I'm tempted to say I like this and drop it at that, however, Not so much. *G*

A few quick takes:
3. Learn about video. ...
This I see as an example of the reason my first photography teacher got involved in photography. Stretch, learn, grow as an artist by moving into something one doesn't normally consider their medium.

7. Put together a book of your work. ...
This goes along with the one about portfolio. Could accomplish two things at once. *G*

9. Remind yourself that the gear you can't afford is not the barrier keeping you from success. Gear has very little to do with photography.
And for this I thank my first photography teacher, who provided one of the simplest of point-and-shoot cameras ever marketed as my first learning tool. Learn what makes an interesting photograph first; learn complex tools later. Thanks, Dad. *G*

12. Go sit in front of the newsstand at some mega book store. Flip through all the magazines that interest you. Go beyond photo magazines. Generally speaking they limit your imagination rather than expand it. Spend at least an hour.
The National Geographic. Yes, it's a Yank publication. And it is also considered one of the premier photography magazines in the world, despite the fact that there is little 'how to' in it about photography. Simply lots of examples of really good work.

14. Rent a medium format film camera and shoot two rolls of 120. Slow down.
Um, don't need to rent one. *G* What film I've shot since acquiring the DSLR is with my medium format. One may slow down with digital; the idea is that film limits the number of frames available, and even though processing and digitisation is relatively inexpensive (perhaps) it is still a resource outlay. This raises awareness of the value of the resources being used. Including, available frame. *G*

16. ... The best camera is the one that's with you.
Yes, this is the one I usually phrase as: The most useless tool one owns, is the one not in hand when one needs it.

Plus, you've given me an idea for another post. I'll need to do a tad of research. Mostly looking for where on the disk the file is stored, and then discover if the links to the source are still active or not. And I do believe today, from sheer perversity, I'll post this both places. Copy and Paste may be a friend...
[User Picture]
From:sarahdotcom
Date:May 19th, 2009 02:53 pm (UTC)
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I disagree that medium format film is cheap to process - mine had to be sent to Germany! Twice! (first time they only did the negatives and not the prints...)
[User Picture]
From:madshutterbug
Date:May 19th, 2009 03:03 pm (UTC)
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Now you've piqued my curiosity. Whatever for would your film need to be sent to Germany for processing? Granted that labs are experiencing the same business stresses as camera stores (the latter are fewer between because of on-line sales and large retail outlets, the former because of digital), they are still about pretty much every country.

I've not had full-roll prints (ie every frame) done for years, other than perhaps a proof-sheet. Then again, when I get prints done (other than proof sheets) I'm asking for large prints. Can't compare that pricing to those done when film is developed.
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From:sarahdotcom
Date:May 19th, 2009 03:09 pm (UTC)
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I have no idea - gave my film to a friend because she said her local Jessops was good, but then they took forever to do it and we were both surprised to learn they had to be sent to Germany!
[User Picture]
From:madshutterbug
Date:May 19th, 2009 03:14 pm (UTC)
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Well, there was once a time when the '49er Gold Miner's of California were sending their laundry to Hawaii ... by sail ... I suppose this isn't much odder. *G*
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From:dianavilliers
Date:May 20th, 2009 01:44 am (UTC)
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To be fair, sarahdotcom is in London, so its not quite as insane as me sending film to Germany for processing.
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From:dianavilliers
Date:May 20th, 2009 02:04 am (UTC)
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How and why and when did you shoot medium format? And how did the results turn out?
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From:sarahdotcom
Date:May 20th, 2009 06:39 am (UTC)
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It was a lomography thingy where they lent you a camera with some film in it and you got to go off and have fun! Some of the photos turned out, I've been meaning to scan them in.
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From:dianavilliers
Date:May 20th, 2009 08:18 am (UTC)
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Sounds pretty cool.
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From:dianavilliers
Date:May 20th, 2009 02:03 am (UTC)
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Mum had a subscription to National Geographic for many, many years. It is indeed a magazine filled with awesome shinyness and brain-food, and I did not like having to wait for her to read it first.
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